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% of frenchmen nosee america favorably versus 42% in 2008. so what is the big lever that has moved the seesaw of america's popularity so radically upward? acknowledgement of world citizenship? yes. but was it also this public apologetic admission by president obama? >> in america, there's a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges, there have been times where america's showed arrogance and been dismissive, even der rissive. >> question. the u.s. has a long standing tradition of not tritticizeing a former president in front of foreign audiences. did obama violate this protocol using terms like arrogance, dismissive, derisive, pat buchanan? >> yes, he did. i think thats with a mistake, and i think he's been scoring off his country repeatedly abroad, and i think it is hurting him very much with the american people. no doubt he's enormously popular and people welcome the first african-american president. he's gone abroad repeatedly to trinidad in front of the latin americans with t
talk radio in america. now there are over 2,000. so you can't tell me that lifting the fairness doctrine was the wrong thing to do. >> host: let's get into the fairness doctrine. it's right here in your subtitle the new fairness doctrine exposed. let's go back a little bit in time. tell us exactly what the fairness doctrine was. >> guest: the fairness doctrine was an fcc, federal communications, regulation. 1949 it was established. it was established to force broadcasters to reach out -- to seek out to opposing issues on controversial issues. back then in 1949, there were only 2,000 radio stations in america. there were only a few fledgling television stations in america. and a glimmer of hope for a television network or two. there wasn't as much media back then. of course, we didn't have the internet and the diversity of media that we have today. it could be argued to some degree that the fairness doctrine was a fair thing back then because if you overloaded one media with a political ideology, it could sway opinion, no question, with the lack of media that we had back then. bu
as they battle straight into the heart of america. >> 1500 died, only 30 were classified as innocent civilians and there were about 50 police officers that died. >> it's a classic turf war between different cartels. >> they spent 23 years fighting for the drug enforcement administration. recently retired he was in charge of global operations for the dea's 5300 special agents. >> along the southwest border is some of the most lucrative turf in the world. location, location, location. >> ten billion dollars in bulk cash grows the u.s.-mexico border on a given day related to drug trafficking. >> ten billion narco trafficking dollars is on par with the tourism industry which generated about $13 billion for mexico. during his presidential campaign felipe calderon vowed to crack down on the cartels. >> the army came in with about 2,000 troops. felipe calderon sent 5,000 additional army troops that will join the police department. >> 45,000 soldiers have been deployed all across mexico, a quarter of the army is now committed to fighting narco terror. >> since december 2006, he has waged a miserable b
that there is a narrative that goes along with a crummy decade which is that in the 1970s america fell away from its greatness. 1980, along comes a man on a great whitehorse, ronald reagan pulls it out and returned to greatness. that's a fairly standard take that a lot of conservative scholars used to explain the time and took the decade. my book tries to compensate both our understanding of carter and of the '70s by looking at the '70s on just as a time of decadence and disco which a definite, but also as a time of intersection. i think it was a lot of kind of soul-searching going on in the '70s. it was a time when people felt comfortable being tough on america, the films of apocalypse now, during this time, manhattan is a famous movie that jimmy carter himself jos twice at the white house during this period of time that i'm studying. and there's a real sense of humility that america has gone through a hard time through vietnam, watergate. and perhaps return to something that can never return to the kind of innocence that might once have had. i think there is a moral seriousness to the '70s that i
believe that elizabeth and i both agree that there needs to be comprehensive health care reform in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. and i hope that it's a bipartisan one that i think can be passed energy. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in a quazi insurance company of its own? >> we can pass health care reform without what is commonly referred to as a public option, which means to compete with your private insurers, with united health care or aetna or blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the option of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass any kind of reform without that public option. for a lot of reasons. one of the things we want to do is make certain we're providing to 46 million americans who are uninsured to 25 million who are underinsured, a way of getting reliable, transparent and cost effective, accessible -- cost accessible insurance. the way you do that is make certain y
with the seawall with his finger. the fable has it parallel in debate on modern values. this time it is america that is trying to put its finger in the dike. to hold back the tide the tide of liberal values spilling over from europe espially from that same small country abutting the north sea with his 16 million dutch citizens. practitioners of a secular values called quote-unquote personal autonomy. the netherlands was the first country to legalize the right to die known as u euthanasia. and dutch has same sex marriage soft drugs, prostitution, and coffee shops that serve hashish. question, are americans destined to take our values cues from the dutch. well jew deyo christian be pushed aside for personal autonomy. is the jesus of bethlehem destined to be side lined by the doctrine and practice of personal autonomy. are we all going dutch? >> we'll ask these experts. paul sar bin, and steven plo ploerow. rabin, and steven ploerow. ploerow. >> plott row. announcer: if. for such a small word, it packs a wallop. if i live to 100. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she say
. jimmy paige. you broke a string. good morning, america. >> good morning. it is sunday, august 23rd. >> yes. >>> despite big rains, pounding surf. looks like we dodged a bullet, new england dodged a bullet. hurricane bill, the first hurricane of the season is heading towards canada, safely offshore. there are ramifications. tropical storm warnings to talk about. we'll bring you the latest, coming up. >>> also, the wildly popular cash for clunkers program comes to an end tomorrow. pumped hundreds of millions of dollars into the economy. sparked the flailing auto industry. but it's had a positive ripple effect on another industry. we'll tell you what you might call a secondary stimulus. >>> also, the international manhunt under way for the reality tv star, who was accused of murdering his ex-wife and former "playboy" model. investigators think he has fled the country. we'll have details on that. >>> also, cutting-edge medical equipment. really cool. giving people in small towns access to a big city doctor without leaving their hospital. it's a robo doc. >>> first, we want to get the l
where he was a contributory a book about physician aided killings. this america there is a lot of people that wrestle with care giving issues and serious illness. we should be encouraging people to have a hopeful vision. when a veteran comes back from aaq they shouldn't be given book like this. they should be encouraged to look at how to maintain their dignity. >> chris: in fairness, the book offers other ideas and statements for veterans to consider and let's put that on the screen. my life should be prolonged as long as it can no matter what its quality and using whatever means possible. and then i believe it is always wrong to with hold not starve treatments that could keep me alive. aren't both sides presented. >> there are lines like that in the book but a fair reading of the book and looking at the cases this they give as examples. the woman ha that's the stroke that says i don't want to live if i can't take care of myself. at the back of the book, the 2007 edition said go to the hemlock society. i think the bias of the document is clear. why would americans be given such a poor do
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
, it was the lutherans' turn. the nation's largest lutheran denomination, the evangelical lutheran church in america, held its biennial assembly in minneapolis. and as kim lawton reports, church policy about gays and lesbians dominated the agenda. >> have no fear, we will pray! >> reporter: they prayed for unity. but disagreements over homosexuality were clear as delegates of the evangelical lutheran church in america-- the e.l.c.a. gathered in minneapolis this week. >> we cannot change god's law and we cannot change what is right and what is wrong. >> how about jesus saying, judge not, that ye not. be judged? >> if you're in favor of the amendment, vote one. if you're opposed, vote two. please vote now. >> reporter: there was vigorous debate about whether the denomination should lift its ban on non-celibate gay and lesbian clergy. at issue was a measure to allow local congregations to hire gay or lesbian pastors who are in lifelong, monogamous relationships. as of friday afternoon, a final vote had yet to be taken. >> it's certainly painful when people say that your relationship or your call are no
? >>> and the tiniest bank in america. no atms, no drive through, and no talk of a bailout. bad cholesterol but your good cholesterol and triglycerides are still out of line? then you may not be seeing the whole picture. ask your doctor about trilipix. if you're at high risk of heart disease and taking a statin to lower bad cholesterol, along with diet, adding trilipix can lower fatty triglycerides and raise good cholesterol to help improve all three cholesterol numbers. trilipix has not been shown to prevent heart attacks or stroke more than a statin alone. trilipix is not for everyone, including people with liver, gallbladder, or severe kidney disease, or nursing women. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take and if you are pregnant or may become pregnant. blood tests are needed before and during treatment to check for liver problems. pain or weakness, as this can be a sign of a rare but serious side effect. this risk may be increased when trilipix is used with a statin. if you cannot afford your medication, call 1-866-4-trilipix for more information. trilipix. there's more to cholestero
think america owes them. >> now, in fairness, the book also offers other ideas and statements for veterans to consider. let's put those on the screen. my life should be prolonged as long as it can no matter what its quality and using any means possible. and then there's this. i believe that it is always wrong to withhold, not start, treatments that could keep me alive. mr. towey, aren't both sides presented? >> there are lines like that in the book, but a fair reading of the book, just looking at the cases they give as examples, where the woman that has the stroke that says i don't want to live if i can't take care of myself and then when you look in the back of the book, chris, who do they refer you to? the 2007 edition said go to compassion choices. that's the hemlock society. the 1997 version referred you to an organization that was the american euthanasia society. i think the bias of the document's clear. why would americans be given such a poor document, a poor planning tool on a subject so important? >> we need to point out that those references which were in the '97 edi
. america once had railways that were the envy of the world, but that was in the age of steam. now there is the push to get america back on track with super fast trains. later on stunned morning. >> in an age where it seems anybody can become a superstar, to in of us the group wilco remains something of a mystery. cynthia bowers this morning will shed some light on that. ♪ >> if you have never heard of wilco, don't blame the band. they are playing to sellout crowds. have won two grammys and have sold 4 million records. there is a mythology you are the greatest band that doesn't get played on the radio. >> we would be happy to be the second greatest band that does get played on the radio. >> later on sunday morning, wilco. persistence paid off for fans that have paid their dues. >> once upon a time there was a falling out in the first family and lasted for years. lesley stahl will show us sometimes you can go home again. >> this is the famous mother daughter reconciliation shot. >> after decades of bad blood and silence treatments, nancy reagan and her daughter patti davis have ma
this past week and i will show you why israel's security is crucial to our own safety right here in america. >> christian contemporary stars point of grace will be here to perform a beautiful song about the relationships between fathers and daughters. >> there have been great moments in sports history. when athletes guaranteed something. do you remember the legendary story of babe ruth pointing toward center field, promising he would hit a home run, and he did? or when new york jets cornerback joe namath stunned the sports world with this guarantee that the jets would beat the baltimore colts in the super bowl. super bowl iii. of course it doesn't always work out like a storybook. in the 2000 nba playoffs, your next-door after doing guaranteed his team would beat the indiana pacers in game six and keep their season alive. ewing missed his last six shots and the pacers won the game and the series. >> this week, president obama pointed his bat at the congress. and he gave it residential guarantee. >> i guarantee you, joe, we're going to get healthcare reform done. speed can the challenge for
attracted interest from america's beat necks in the 1950's. coincidentally with the interest of american diplomats and the central intelligence agency, people like jack karowac, who was an absolutely unknown writer, were developing an interest in buddhism, generally. first in zen buddhism and secondly through the work of robert campbell in buddhism. the mid 1950's were a period of cultural ferment in the united states with the beat neck movement that would eventually become the support basis for the tibetan resistance, but eventually took about 20 years, because something else was happening in 1955 when geshae sailed into new york harbor. here in washington, d.c., president eisenhower was trying to figure out how best to fight against international communism. in a series of national security council meetings throughout 955, he had been presented with options from open warfare to covert sub version of russian and chinese communist activity around the world. it was only recently learned that in the early 1950's, the u.s. intelligence services had picked up definitive information that russi
as they provide their and set. the supreme court, home to america's highest court. >> private donations? >> grants, and stuff like that. >> donations? >> i do not know. >> federally? >> america's cable companies created a c-span as a public service, a private business initiative. no government mandate. no government money. "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now for a discussion of if anything and everything. ron, and lilnda, she is a political correspondent for the christian science monitor -- that is lilnda. so, the obama family goes off for a week of fun. there will begin to run ads in that local market. would you make of this? guest: it shows two things -- the president never truly goes on vacation. he can put on a good show of being at the beach. he does not have to turn on his tv. he can to net this out. president obama is pretty good at controlling what he pays attention to. he manages his own the time. host: here is this headline that obama tackles the health care reformers. he has been trying to do that all week. how is he doing in this critical area? guest: it shows how far
, as it were? >> well, tavis, if we're going to have fair health care in america and not have single payer, which means the government does it all, then there has to be -- there must be a public option, which is to say the government has to provide a competitive alternative to private insurance companies and this talk about well, maybe we don't actually need a public option, maybe we can get a couple of co-ops to do something is really nonsense. if there is to be health care, government has to be present with a public option so there is genuine competition and the insurance companies know they have got to offer fair prices and fair contracts to those who they contract with. frankly i don't think there will be health care at all unless there is a public option and i hope to god that means there will be a public option. tavis: interdependence in part means having civil dialogue with our friends and neighbors around the world. what is your sense of how these uncivil conversations of late have been taking place around this contentious issue of health care? >> that is a great way to put it, tav
of different plans is what we want to preserve for america. >> schieffer: all right, so senator conrad, you have been one of those talking about the so-called co-op plan, and that would be you would have a cooperative that would provide this insurance to people instead of the public option, but i want to just go back. you say the public option just simply can't pass. you still believe that? you think the president should just drop that and get on to something else? >> i would say this. it is very clear that in the united states senate, the public option does not have the votes. if we have to get to 60 votes, you cannot get there with public option. that's why i was asked to come up with an alternative, and the alternative i came up with was this cooperative approach that, as senator grassley correctly describes is not government run or government controlled, it's controlled by its membership but it does provide not-for-profit competition to insurance companies, so it has appeal on both sides. it's the only proposal that has bipartisan support and if we're going to get 60 votes we're going t
influence grows. what if they were to lose faith in america? what if they were to use their economic clout in various countries? the first thing you should know about wen jiabao is he's quite different from other leaders in the chinese era. his followers have a nickname for him, grandpa wen. he flew out to a devastated area, met with them individually. he behaves more like a chinese politician. he is a politician within the ranks of his political party. i asked him about one of the most difficult times of his life, tiananmen square. i heard the other chinese officials in the room gasp. wen paused for what seemed like a minute, and then he answered with surprising frankness. listen carefully to what he says about chinese democracy. this was the heart of the interview. wen made clear that his country is moving toward the day when it will resemble a western-style democracy in some ways. he expressed a simple but powerful conviction, that government should answer to its people, and he acknowledged that he could see a time when china would have a two-party election. wen also said china needs a
people on his hands now free and celebrated as a hero back home. tonight, one of america's closest allies rejects the accusations that it struck a deal to free the lockerbie bomber and reaction from the former leader of the investigation, here in the u.s. >> a present inferno. fire consumes a kentucky prison in the midst of a massive riots. now investigators want to know how the prison descended into chaos. >> plus a victim of its own success. as the cash for clunkers program speeds to its monday cut off, folks across the country are racing to the dealer hoping for a last minute bargain. but some are finding out it's already too late. >> julie: a "fox news" whether alerts. the first atlantic hurricane of the season for the off the east coast tonight churning up rough seas and recurrence. hurricane bill will likely not make landfall here in the u.s. but it is still packing or the forceful winds reaching up to 85 mph. it is ruining one of the last vacation weekends of the summer. one of the states being hit forces of massachusetts. resident obama is traveling there tomorrow with his family.
voted for president obama by a wide margin but i think people feel the way most of america does and it needs fixing. >> geraldo: and thele denverly, people who used to be just automatic democrats seem not to be rallying to the president, bob. >> there is a huge amount of medicare that could get cut. they have a terrific program right now. in massachusetts, they have the closest to universal health coverage but a $9 billion deficit and the emergency room swamped now with people who have healthcare insurance. >> geraldo: when you come back you hall fresh voices involved in the acrimonious debate. former congressman j.c. watts joining us. sc kupp also joining us. we are live and at large in marthas it vineyard, waiting for bill and president obama. me again. okay, now this is the last time alright? thanks, you know we don't deliver anything like this. this crispy flatbread. mmmm. mmmmm! introducing the taste that's never been delivered. digiorno crispy flatbread pizza. it's not delivery, it's digiorno. that's a-- tiny netbook. yeah, it's-- good-looking, lightweight. generally aweso
with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. >> brand new pictures just into fox news of a small plane crash in california. take a look. the f.a.a. says this pilot of the piper pa-42 radioed for help, saying that he'd run out of gas and needed to land. look where he ended up landing, he put the tiny plane down on highway 101 in santa barbara. the plane then struck by three cars that couldn't get out of the way in time. police say miraculously, the two people on the plane and three people in the cars were not hurt. the highway had to be shut down of course, as you can imagine, for a short time while that accident scene was cleared. wow, amazing pictures nasa managers meeting for a final review ahead of space shuttle launch. wanted to take you to a live look of the shuttle. the only outstanding issue is a failed power converter that was replaced last week. testing on the converter has reportedly gone well so far. forecasters say there is an 80% chanc
's video scrapbook, nicole takes us to visit a part of america that you might not realize is part of america! >> reporter: welcome to the caribbean island of puerto rico. we're in san juan, the capital and largest city. although christopher columbus landed here in 1493, europeans didn't start to settle in puerto rico until 1508. that's when the explorer ponce de leon founded the first settlement. he's the guy who's famous for trying to find the fountain of youth. the san juan cathedral is a favorite stop for tourists. this is where ponce de leon is buried. not only that, but marc anthony got married here to his first wife. puerto rico means "rich port." it was an important stop for spanish ships carrying gold and silver from the new world. and that attracted pirates of the caribbean, as well as european invaders. now, ships of a different kind come here -- puerto rico is a popular port for cruises. in fact, tourism is one of the island's most important industries. to get a taste of san juan's past, all you have to do is just walk around. high on the "must see" list is el morro one
oadcasters in america we are going to me bk and have atriking conversation. >> "whe house chronicle" is curtisn collaboration with whutt, howard university television. now, the program hosts, nationally syndicated columst llewellyn king, ando-host, linda gasparello. >> hello again, and thank you for coming alo. i promid you one of the people i admire in wasngton journalism, d here he is -- bob scranton. you probably remember him fro more than 20 years on cnn. -- herhe is -- bob frken. his real genius, ihink, has been kept from many o you, it as a writer. you can read him now politicsdailcom. you can look iup on thweb. i promise you wl be enrtained and enlightened. welcome to the show. tell me what it is likeo be a television correspondent it is thought of as alamorous thin is it glamors? >> i thinkou could take one look at me and see justow unglamorous it is. is actually quite bit of tedium. i think most people forget telesion the job of journali is the tedium of getting information right, the tedium of waing -- >> awaiting i can attest to. >> not to say at is not exciting. used to
-safe america shows nearly half of middle-schoolers have been victims of cyber-bullying. nearly half also admit they've been the bully. some kids do it for laughs some kids do it to get a reaction and some kids do it because they're friends were victims and they wanted revenge. wiredsafety.org created the teenangels to help educate kids about staying safe online. members of this chapter at new york's ursuline school helped younger students identify cyberbullying. greg, a high school student, was changing in the locker room one day after school, when his friend matt took an embarrassing picture of him. within seconds the picture was sent among all the cell phones at the school. even though many kids have been victims of cyberbullying, they don't tell their parents. >> we have found over 60 reasons why kids say they do not want to tell their parents. they are worried they will be considered a tattletale by their friends, they're worried that their parents will get worried and take away their computer. this 6th grader, also named didn't tell her parents because the boy doing the bullying was a fam
to the canadian healthcare system as what we should have here in america. but do we want a health system that's imploding. dr. doig declined to appear but an orthopedic surgeon and former president of the healthcare system. >> the biggest problem is access. and by access we have -- in the canadian system the first line of defense for a sick patient is a family doctor and out of a population of 33 million, 5 million canadians do not have a family doctor. >> so you don't have enough doctors. and is it because the doctors don't get paid as well as they get paid in the united states? per 100,000, you're down about 30% from where we are. we have 30% more doctors per hundred thousand. is it because you don't pay them as well? >> no no. we rank 36 out of 28 in the developed countries for the amount of doctors of population. it's part of the mechanism of rationing that has to happen when you promise to deliver everything and don't have enough resources. >> you have enough doctors but you have too many cases and too much illness to treat so people get on a line and
efficient rather than making it smaller. i have one of the most important broadcasters in america. we are going to come back and have a striking conversation. >> "white house chronicle" is curtis in collaboration with whutt, howard university television. now, the program hosts, nationally syndicated columnist llewellyn king, and co-host, linda gasparello. >> hello again, and thank you for coming along. i promised you one of the people i admire in washington journalism, and here he is -- bob scranton. you probably remember him from more than 20 years on cnn. -- here he is -- bob franken. his real genius, i think, has been kept from many of you, it is as a writer. you can read him now politicsdaily.com. you can look it up on the web. i promise you will be entertained and enlightened. welcome to the show. tell me what it is like to be a television correspondent. it is thought of as a glamorous thing. is it glamorous? >> i think you could take one look at me and see just how unglamorous it is. is actually quite a bit of tedium. i think most people forget television. the job of journalism
people america it is literally bursting with talent it comes in all shapes colors genders sizes, a talent is meaningless without a work ethic. if you are not willing to sit down on a beautiful day like today and do the work if you're the kind of person that always has the excuse why i cannot write today, then you will not right. sometimes i do read things to get the rhythm right sometimes the rhythm is different than not -- to print a novel is different although there is the iambic pentameter but when you do the rhythm for the newspaper he wanted the rhythm that is not state the you want it to pull you to the next idea i used the wrong word there. words have a specific meaning i did not mean that. do not know what word i want to use. i have to think about that now i am harsh know because i feel strongly about it. that is not write either. i take it very seriously as a craft. i do not like the word arch because of there is any are to a new bid will emerge. do not sit down to write down a pole or artistic masterpiece expect the report writer to deliver on kraft. do the best you can given th
by a wide margin but i think people feel the way most of america does and it needs fixing. >> geraldo: and thele denverly, people who used to be just automatic democrats seem not to be rallying to the president, bob. >> there is a huge amount of medicare that could get cut. they have a terrific program right now. in massachusetts, they have the closest to universal health coverage but a $9 billion deficit and the emergency room swamped now with people who have healthcare insurance. >> geraldo: when you come back you hall fresh voices involved in the acrimonious debate. former congressman j.c. watts joining us. sc kupp also joining us. we are live and at large in marthas it vineyard, waiting for bill and president obama. opportunity. at amway global, it's the foundation of our business. because opportunity built nutrilite, the world's... top-selling vitamin, mineral, and supplement brand. and artistry, one of the world's best-selling beauty brands. which makes amway global the online... health and beauty leader. and worldwide, amway has over 8 billion in annual sales. for your opportun
on every continent as the economic influence grows. what if they were to lose faith in america? what if they were to lose their economic clout in various countries? the first thing you should know about wen jiabao is he's quite different from other leaders in the chinese modern era. his followers have a nickname for him, grandpa wen. aft year's earthquake in sichuan, he flew out to a devastated area, met with them individually. he behaves more like an american politician than a chinese leader. he is an agile politician inside the ranks of his own party. i asked him about one of the most difficult times of his life, tiananmen square. it was a controversial question. i heard the other chinese officials in the room gasp. the interpreter got nervous. wen paused for what seemed like a minute, and then he answered with surprising frankness. and listen carefully to what he says about chinese democracy. this was the heart of the interview. wen made clear that his country is moving toward the day when it will resemble a western-style democracy in some ways. he expressed a simple but powerful
's laest lutheran denomination, the engelical utheran church in america, hd its biennial assembly in minapolis. and as k lawton reports, crch policy about gays and lesbns dominated the agenda. >> he no fear, we will pray! >> rerter: they prayed for unity. but disagrments over homosexuity were clear as deletes of the evangelical lutheran church inmerica-- the e.l.c.agathered in minneapolis is week. >> we cannot changeod's law ande cannot change what is right nd what is wrong. how about jesus saying, juge not, tt ye not. be judged? >> if you're in favor ofhe amendmt, vote one. if you're oppos, vote two. plse vote now. >> reporter: tre was vigorous debate about whethethe denominati should lift its ban on non-celibate gaynd lesbian clery. aissue was a measure to allow loal congregations to hire gay or lesbian pasts who are in lifelong, monogamo relatnships. as of friday afternn, a final vote had t to be taken. >> it's certaiy painful when people say th your relationship or your call re t valid. >> reporter: aft acknowledging his relationship with anoer man, atlanta pastor braey schmel
magazine, cal thomas, jim pinkerton, fellow, new america foundation and fox forum contributor and kirsten powers, "new york post" columnist. i'm john scott, fox news watch is on right now. >> what is your response so far to the suggestion that the healthcare reform might not include a public option? is it winning any converts, angering quarters? >> on the messaging process, do you accept any responsibility on the fact that you haven't some of the other issues on healthcare that you had, whether on incorrect interpretations of the bill, other than do you accept any of that responsibility or all just the media's fault? >> mr. president, thank you for taking my call. >> hi, tracy. >> hi. until i heard you say that a private option is a sliver of your healthcare proposal recently, i think myself and many americans thought it pretty much was your principle. >> i know. >> can you please explain five or six bullet point of what legislation must include for you to be willing to sign it. for instance, employer mandate, tofrt reform, illegal immigrants what about them. must include public option. >
system that is breaking america's families. breaking america's businesses and breaking america's economy. >> president obama was responding to a comment by republican senator jim dement of south carolina. >> senator mccain and senator obama both talked about health care reform during the campaign. now it's only the democrats that want to reform, not the republicans and it's really hurting him politically. >> christine, a lot of money. take a look at this number. estimated price of president obama's health care plan is a trillion dollars, that's estimated over ten years. a huge expense, arguments being made on both sides. some saying we can't afford to do this, the government's too big. others saying we can't afford not to do it because the medical system is broken. >> millions of americans are saying i'm paying as much for my health care as for my rent or very close and i can't go on like that. so you have a situation where you're talking about big dollars from washington if you do something and big dollar it is you don't. and you have people on the ground who don't have health insurance
that at nationals park before "take me out to the ball game." question we shall have "god bless america."   >> ladies and gentleme please joins as we honor our country. here to perform "god bless america" one again, sarah grave. ♪ god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand besides her ♪ and guide her ♪ ♪ there through the night with a light from above ♪ ♪ from the mountains to the prairie ♪ to the oceans ♪ ♪ god bless america my home sweet home ♪ ♪ god bless america, my home sweet home ♪ [ cheers and applause ] oto with a flick, there's an app for that. if you want to share contact info with a bump, there's an app for that. or if you just want to share some downtime, well, there's an app for that too. because there's an app for just about anything. only on the iphone.  >> debbi:  an 8-3 lead as w move to the bottom of the 7th. a survey features eight members of the nats. they were voted by league managers in the survey. the list include seth bynum, the best defensive second baseman. the shortstop desmond got best infield a
.m. eastern. >> this fall, into the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. "the supreme court," coming up for sunday in october on c-span. >> and now north carolina congressman patrick henry and a town hall meeting. he takes questions from the audits. lawmakers across the country are holding similar meetings this month. this is about 90 minutes. >> thank you all for coming out >> is always great to be home. i represent 10 counties across western north carolina but this is where i went from. it is great to be at home. i am glad that you all came out tonight. last year we had a town hall meeting in techerryvile. 19 people showed up. but thanks to the rest of you for coming out tonight. i hold town meetings every town -- every august, one in every county that i represent. i send e-mail out, youtube videos, and try to keep in constant contact about what is happening in washington and what i am doing. can also seem to me to be a great way to get this exchange of ideas -- town halls seem to me to be a great way to get fixed ex
't about politics. this is about a health care system that is breaking america's families. breaking america's businesses and breaking america's economy. >> president obama was responding to a comment by republican senator jim demint of south carolina. how has the president done so far on this? i mean, they clearly have not been on track. >> during the campaign senator mccain and senator obama both talked about health care reform. everyone agreed that something had to be done. how they got off track that now it's only the democrats who want reform and not the republicans and he hasn't been able to keep his bipartisan word, it's really hurting him politically. >> christine, let's talk about money. a lot of money obviously. take a look at this number. estimated price of president obama's health care plan is a trillion dollars, estimated over ten years. it's in a multitrillion dollar budget but still a huge expense. arguments are made on both sides, some saying we can't afford to do this. the government is too big. others say we can't afford not to do it because the current system is broken and
. this is about a health care system that is breaking america's families, breaking america's businesses and breaking america's economy. ". >> president obama was responding to it a comments by republican senator jim demint of south carolina. how has the president done so far? they clearly have not been on track. >> during the campaign, senator mccain and senator obama both talked with health care reform. everyone agreed that something had to be done. how they got off track, that now it's only the democrats who want to reform and not the republicans and he hasn't beenable too keep his bipartisan world is hurting him politically. >> let's talk about a lot of money obviously. estimated price of president obama's health care form is a trillion dollars. that's estimated over ten years and it's in a multitrillion dollar budget, but a huge expense. arguments on both side, some saying we can't afford to do this, the government is spending too much money already, others saying we can't afford not to did it because the current system is broke and with medical costs riser faster than inflation, ev
can watch this program again or other recent ago america and the courts" programs at c-span.org. join us next week for "america and the coursurts." >> you are watching c-span, created for you as a public service by america's cable companies. coming up next, world war ii veterans talk about their experience. then a look at research into lost jewish assets taken by the nazis. then a discussion with the doctor on the team who tried to say president kennedy's life after he was shot. >> john mccaslin is interviewed on after words, tonight at 10:00 p.m. eastern on book tv. >> the world were ii memorial honors all those who served on the frontlines and on the home front. recently a group of veterans talked about their experiences during the war and the 60 get anniversary of the d-day invasion. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> welcome to the eisenhower presidential library museum and are commemoration of the it anniversary of the d-day invasion. we intended are commemorative program to be a tribute to all veterans, but to veterans of the second world war in particular. we could think
$99.99 shopping online can help save. doing it with bank of america can help save a lot more. up to 20% cash back from over 300 online retailers with our add it up program. just sign up and use your bank of america debit or credit card when you shop online. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. ♪ >> i love that song. speaking of private eyes you're on facebook, you have friend, you have family but some people feel a need to bombard you with every little detail of their lives. >> so we're hoping to call those people out. naming the most annoying type of facebookers. josh has been looking into it. >> you guys got a lot of messages. >> they say hey i know every single person on that list. and one person said i am some of those people on that list. >> i'm seeing the same thing. let's tell everybody about this. cnn.com put out this story about the 12 most annoying facebookers like the people who try to tell you what they had for lunch. here's a quiz to determine if you are these people. let's look at these pictures that represent the 12 most ann
was quite large and so you can imagine there are many other copies of this book in america, all over the world now and that's the power of the printing press but when everything is made entirely by hand, each manuscript is a unique handwritten object often a work of art. i like to think of them all as marks of lives well spent and each one is valuable in it's own right. and what's important to remember is that the people who made these books were very often not writing text for the first time. they were copying other text so in the middle ages scribes were copiers, they weren't authors. and so the scribe is copying this text and if you look at the bottom of the page, he missed out a line so he wrote it in. and then the artist came along and he drew this character here pulling up the line with a rope and inserted it into the right place in the text. and when you get that, you suddenly realize that you've understood a 13th century joke and the page comes along and whenever you look at any of these pages that i'm going to show you from now on, you must imagine them as handwritten and th
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